Subproject B05 —  Securitisation and desecuritisation
in international trusteeship administrations

Bild: UN-Fahrzeug

In the research project, we investigate securitisation and desecuritisation processes within the context of external state building through international trusteeship administrations. The external administrations instituted since the end of the Second World War by the United Nations pursue the goal of creating security and democratic statehood. Doing so is intended to put a population in a position to exercise the right to self-determination and make it able to effectively protect itself against internal and external threats. The position of interim administrations within this is fundamentally tense: On the one hand, their legitimacy is based on discursively constructed existential threats such as the return of oppression and violence, possible interventions by neighbouring states or the rise of criminal groups, which justify foreign rule. On the other hand, the interim administration must prove that it and the institutions authorised by it are in a position to handle these threats. In this respect, the actors in external state building operate a policy of both securitisation and desecuritisation.

The subjects of the SFB sub-project are the securitisation and desecuritisation discourse and practices of two different historical types of international interim administrations: In relation to the UN Trusteeship System, we investigate the cases of British and French mandated territories in Cameroon and the Australian administration of Papua New Guinea. While these administrations primarily had a political objective of decolonialisation, the external administrations of East Timor and Kosovo are part of international discourse on the importance of functioning statehood for peace and security.

The cases are compared within the research project. The issue of similarities and differences between the different discourse and practices of external interim administrations is central, particularly with regard to the progression and use of violence in the respective political transition processes. Two central aspects for the SFB are taken into special consideration in the project - the territorial dimension of securitisation processes and the dynamics of securitisation and desecuritisation: Firstly, creating territorial areas administratively and protecting them against perceived threats are some of the key duties of interim administrations. Secondly, the dynamics of security do not just arise from the tense position of securitisation and desecuritisation typical of external state formation but also from the fact that local actors may consider an interim administration to be a threat to their own identity in the course of the formation of a “political agency” and dispute its claim to power.

 

 

 

 

Subproject B05 —  Securitisation and desecuritisation
in international trusteeship administrations

Bild: UN-Fahrzeug

In the research project, we investigate securitisation and desecuritisation processes within the context of external state building through international trusteeship administrations. The external administrations instituted since the end of the Second World War by the United Nations pursue the goal of creating security and democratic statehood. Doing so is intended to put a population in a position to exercise the right to self-determination and make it able to effectively protect itself against internal and external threats. The position of interim administrations within this is fundamentally tense: On the one hand, their legitimacy is based on discursively constructed existential threats such as the return of oppression and violence, possible interventions by neighbouring states or the rise of criminal groups, which justify foreign rule. On the other hand, the interim administration must prove that it and the institutions authorised by it are in a position to handle these threats. In this respect, the actors in external state building operate a policy of both securitisation and desecuritisation.

The subjects of the SFB sub-project are the securitisation and desecuritisation discourse and practices of two different historical types of international interim administrations: In relation to the UN Trusteeship System, we investigate the cases of British and French mandated territories in Cameroon and the Australian administration of Papua New Guinea. While these administrations primarily had a political objective of decolonialisation, the external administrations of East Timor and Kosovo are part of international discourse on the importance of functioning statehood for peace and security.

The cases are compared within the research project. The issue of similarities and differences between the different discourse and practices of external interim administrations is central, particularly with regard to the progression and use of violence in the respective political transition processes. Two central aspects for the SFB are taken into special consideration in the project - the territorial dimension of securitisation processes and the dynamics of securitisation and desecuritisation: Firstly, creating territorial areas administratively and protecting them against perceived threats are some of the key duties of interim administrations. Secondly, the dynamics of security do not just arise from the tense position of securitisation and desecuritisation typical of external state formation but also from the fact that local actors may consider an interim administration to be a threat to their own identity in the course of the formation of a “political agency” and dispute its claim to power.